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Purchasing Hardwood Floors— What To Know Before Buying

Whats Really Inside The Big Box?               

 
                   Consumers may be lured in by competition in the hardwood arena, but consumers oftentimes don’t realize what they’re buying. Mohawk looks at competitor’s negative reviews and communicates the facts with its hardwood classification and grading terms system.               

Consumers can be lured in by the big box competition’s low prices. However, most consumers don’t know what they’re buying- and that several products lack the craftsmanship, durability and quality that Mohawk Hardwood offers.

 

Read what consumers are really saying about your so-called competition. Here are just two examples taken from the many bad reviews written by actual consumers who bought from the “other guys”:

 

Consumer 1: “Worst experience ever. The sales staff was overbearing and arrogant. We chose Red Oak, which was one of the least expensive options, but was only .50 per sq. ft. less than the competition. The quality of the flooring was mixed, lots of blemishes, a really wide variation in color for something called Red Oak; many pieces were almost black rather than uniform in color. And, we ended up pulling out pieces from many of the boxes that filled one whole box with some other kind of wood, not the oak that we ordered. All in all, I will never use _____again and cannot recommend them to anyone.”

 

Consumer 2: “We special ordered a cherry hardwood floor from _____that was highly rated by Consumer Reports in this year’s current issue. We had to wait the standard 7-10 days and had to pay in full. Well, I am not sure of the main claims on the flooring yet, however, the floor looks awful. Some of the boards are not stained properly and show discolorations, they are all small pieces so it appears that we salvaged flooring from somewhere instead of having purchased it new. I am out roughly $2,000 and cannot afford to pull out this floor and purchase a new one. I fear that this wood will make it more difficult to sell my home in the future. I have 2 more rooms of this stuff to install so that all my flooring is the same and that will mean more money!”

 

Mohawk is working to educate consumers on the grading of hardwood. Share this information with your customers- and explain why YOU are the expert:

 

Mohawk classifies its hardwood based on the amount of natural character visible in the finished product.  These visual classifications help you select the wood that best fits your personal design style.

 

Common Hardwood Grading Terms, Definitions and Examples

 

Example Grading Term and Definition

 

Refined Class also known as Select & Better – Is the very best hardwood flooring grade which has the most uniform color, longer lengths, virtually no blemishes or knots.

Traditional Class also known as #1 Common – Boards  starting to show the natural character such as lighter and darker  boards, may have shorter board lengths, infrequent knots, mineral and  other character marks possible.

Vintage Class also known as Character Grade – Boards  show a lot of natural color variation such as light and dark boards,  large knots and more frequent character marks than Traditional Class.

Character Class also known as #2 Common  – Boards  offer the most natural color variation and more character marks and  visually distinct with knots, larger filled knots and the most mineral  marks.

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© 2011 Mohawk Industries    Terms & Conditions
         

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